Tag Archives: Addiction

Reaching For Booze & Food in Lockdown?

1 Sep
Photo by Pavel Danilyuk from Pexels

Usually we know deep within ourselves if what we are reaching for is either good for us or less good! 

Do the usual rules and routines feel a bit like they’ve flown out the window in lockdown? And, who is around to hold us accountable? Just because we might be able to wear pyjamas or elastic waist pants, probably doesn’t mean we shouldn’t consider how many calories, and how much fat and sugar might be hiding in tempting treats.

Social media is normalising baking up a storm. Our feeds are full of it. There’s quarantini parties and invitations to join happy hour online. We might have to ask if we want to join the pack, or lead it? Just because everyone is doing it, doesn’t mean we have to. Social media is normalising baking up a storm. Our feeds are full of it. There’s quarantini parties and invitations to join happy hour online. We might have to ask if we want to join the pack, or lead it? Just because everyone is doing it, doesn’t mean we have to. Maybe it’s a better idea to limit or be more conscious of what we’re consuming and be kinder to our immune systems at a time they really need support?

Whether we’re in lockdown or not, it’s always a good idea to be more aware of what we reach for to cope, self soothe, relax and relieve stress.

  • It pays to be less impulsive.
  • To have supplies on hand that support healthier choices.
  • It’s very much about swapping out the harmful choices. Like choosing to vape as a pathway to quitting cigarettes. Like trying an alcohol free product.
  • It’s about sticking to the types of limits and routines that are closer to what we usually did pre-lockdown.

Of course not everyone has a problem. A treat here and there is joy inducing. But if you’re putting Baileys on your porridge in the morning you might want to reconsider your choices! Same if you’re baking and eating a whole cake a day. If you’re treating everyday like a treat filled weekend day, or if you’re in recovery leaning closer into relapsing, you’ll definitely want to search a bit deeper and find out what lies beneath your choices.

In that case you could ask, Why am I doing it?

What am I hoping to gain from doing it?

Universally, the answers are to seek relief and to feel better. Luckily there’s a ton of other ways to self soothe, relax and reduce stress.

If you’re not sure your intake is ok, reach out to an expert to check whether what you’re doing might have negative consequences on your emotional wellbeing, your health, finances and whether it impacts others. 

All addictive substances neurologically hijack our brains pleasure and reward centre. They’re all short lasting and then need repeating. That’s how dependence can occur. 

Instead of reaching for something we kind of know we shouldn’t, we could ask ourselves, What do I really need right now. And then do that instead.

Whether we’re over indulging or not, these are pretty stressful times which put our nervous systems on high alert, so it never hurts to explore and name feelings, and then think about what else we could do with those feelings rather than stuff them, or ignore them.

We can all benefit from learning to release pressure in positive ways. Mindfulness. Meditation. Moving our bodies. Getting outdoors, even if it’s only our backyard. We can all benefit from learning to release pressure in positive ways. Mindfulness. Meditation. Moving our bodies. Getting outdoors. It all helps.

  • We need to remember to connect in with uplifting people, posts and things.
  • To give our full attention to tasks.
  • To make sure those tasks feel fulfilling and feed our souls.
  • To have rituals that restore us.
  • To do more deep breathing.
  • To laugh more.
  • To feel gratitude.
  • And to sleep well, because it’s so crucial in helping us cope better emotionally.

What’s really key in making healthy choices, is to work out other alternative sources, that still feel satisfying and soothing. 

Let’s remember we aren’t aiming to come out of lockdown as a Masterchef or an addict so it’s ok to take it a little easy. Sending love and strength to all who may need it. I’d love to hear how you relax, reduce stress and soothe yourself.

Why are Some Homes Predictably Unpredictable?

27 Nov

When a parent is addicted to a substance, home life is often tense and unpredictable, and family members may either try to deny the addicts behaviour, make excuses for it, or attempt to control or stop it. For the one choosing to drink or drug, it’s hard to maintain rewarding healthy connections and be emotionally available.

So much time and energy gets gobbled up trying to either recover, obtain, use, and/or try to keep it secret. Addiction messes with mood and sleep and has personal, social, financial, health, relationship and even legal consequences. 

If one or both parents are emotionally or physically unavailable long term, children can develop a fear of abandonment and learn that holding onto toxic relationships is better than being alone. Drinking and/or drugging is also so boring to grow up around. When the “substance” of choice is the priority, the child isn’t, and that reaffirms their sense of  not really being worthy enough to get to know, listen to, learn about or have an in-depth relationship with.

Growing up around addiction, kids have to guess at what normal is. They are more subjected to chaos and Continue reading

Reasons Why, For Dry July.

4 Jul

Reposting from http://www.womansday.co.nz/health-diet/health/2015/6/the-benefits-of-taking-a-break-from-alcohol/

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Here’s how Dry July could benefit your own health as well as those you’re fundraising for

Dry July encourages participants to go alcohol-free for a month to raise funds for adults living with cancer, but the benefits of doing the challenge don’t stop there.

Leanne French, a relationship therapist and addictions counsellor, says taking a break from the booze could have a positive impact on your health and mental wellbeing.

“Drinking even small amounts of alcohol often can make you feel tired and depressed,” says Ms French, who has been a counsellor for over 25 years.

“One of the biggest benefits from taking a break is that people feel healthier and better in the morning, and have more energy, which naturally leads on to doing other healthy things, like eating better food and exercising.”

There’s also the ‘feel-good factor’ associated with setting yourself a goal and achieving it, and that can help improve your self-esteem. Not only that, going alcohol-free for a month could give you the opportunity to improve your relationships with the loved ones in your life.

“Drinking and recovering from drinking can be selfish. It can shut other people out and make you less physically and emotionally available to your partner,” Ms French says.

“Taking a break means you can assess whether this is happening, and may change your attitude to alcohol if it’s something that is having an impact on your relationship with a loved one.”

For more information on Dry July, visit their website.

Image: Getty

Other media releases http://www.nzwomansweekly.co.nz/health-home/health/reaping-the-benefits-of-dry-july/

http://gemsofgorgeousness.com/5-reasons-to-do-dry-july/